Potassium Acetate (Lexi-Drugs)

Drug Shortages

One or more forms of this drug may be in short supply or unavailable. Refer to the following for additional information:

ASHP: http://www.ashp.org/menu/DrugShortages

Pronunciation

(poe TASS ee um AS e tate)

Pharmacologic Category

Electrolyte Supplement, Parenteral

Dosing: Adult

Note: When maintaining normal daily requirements, IV doses should be incorporated into the patient’s maintenance IV fluids. Intermittent IV potassium administration should be reserved for more severe depletion situations in patients undergoing ECG monitoring. Doses expressed as mEq of potassium.

Hypokalemia, treatment: IV intermittent infusion: Peripheral or central line: ≤10 mEq/hour; repeat as needed based on frequently obtained lab values; central line infusion and continuous ECG monitoring highly recommended for infusions >10 mEq/hour

Potassium dosage/rate of infusion general guidelines (per product labeling): Note: High variability exists in dosing/infusion rate recommendations; therapy guided by patient condition and specific institutional guidelines. As an estimate, 10 mEq of potassium will roughly increase serum levels by 0.1 mEq/L. Patients with more severe forms of hypokalemia (eg, serum potassium levels <3.5 mEq/L) may require increased amounts due to total body potassium deficit (Flurie 2017).

Serum potassium >2.5 to 3.5 mEq/L: Maximum infusion rate: 10 mEq/hour; maximum concentration: 40 mEq/L; maximum 24-hour dose: 200 mEq

Serum potassium <2.5 mEq/L or symptomatic hypokalemia (excluding emergency treatment of cardiac arrest): Maximum infusion rate (central line only): 40 mEq/hour in presence of continuous ECG monitoring and frequent lab monitoring; in selected situations, patients may require up to 400 mEq/24 hours.

Dosing: Geriatric

Refer to adult dosing.

Dosing: Renal Impairment: Adult

Reduce initial dose by at least 50% in patients with renal impairment (Kraft 2005). Potassium acetate administration may also increase serum aluminum and bicarbonate. Contraindicated in patients with renal failure.

Dosing: Hepatic Impairment: Adult

There are no dosage adjustment provided in the manufacturer’s labeling. Use with caution due to impaired liver utilization of bicarbonate.

Dosing: Pediatric

Note: Maintenance potassium should be incorporated into the patient’s maintenance IV fluids; intermittent IV potassium administration should be reserved for severe depletion situations; continuous ECG monitoring should be used for intermittent doses >0.5 mEq/kg/hour. Acid/base balance should be considered when selecting a potassium salt for maintenance therapy or treatment of hypokalemia; acetate is converted to bicarbonate in the body and may affect serum pH. Doses listed as mEq of potassium.

Parenteral nutrition, maintenance requirement: IV: As an additive to parenteral nutrition solution (Mirtallo 2004):

Infants and Children weighing ≤50 kg: 2 to 4 mEq/kg/day

Children weighing >50 kg and Adolescents: 1 to 2 mEq/kg/day

Hypokalemia, severe; treatment: Infants, Children, and Adolescents: Intermittent IV infusion: 0.5 to 1 mEq/kg/dose; maximum dose: 40 mEq/dose, infuse at a rate ≤0.5 mEq/kg/hour (see Administration for more detail on rate) (Corkins 2015; Fuhrman 2017, Kliegman 2016); serum concentrations should be evaluated 1 to 2 hours after completion of infusion; may repeat as needed based on lab values; severe depletion or ongoing losses may require >200% of normal daily maintenance

Dosing: Renal Impairment: Pediatric

There are no specific dosage adjustments provided in the manufacturer’s labeling. Based on experience in adult patients, reduce initial dose by at least 50% in patients with renal impairment (Kraft 2005). Potassium acetate administration may also increase serum aluminum and bicarbonate serum concentrations. Contraindicated in patients with renal failure.

Dosing: Hepatic Impairment: Pediatric

There are no dosage adjustments provided in the manufacturer’s labeling. Use with caution due to impaired liver utilization of bicarbonate.

Use: Labeled Indications

Hypokalemia: Treatment and prevention of hypokalemia when it is necessary to avoid chloride or acid/base status requires an additional source of bicarbonate.

Administration: IV

Potassium must be diluted prior to parenteral administration. For IV infusion; do not administer IV push. In general, the rate of administration may be dependent on patient condition and specific institution policy. Some clinicians recommend that the maximum concentration for peripheral infusion is 10 mEq/100 mL and maximum rate of administration for peripheral infusion is 10 mEq/hour (Kraft 2005). ECG monitoring is recommended for peripheral or central infusions >10 mEq/hour (Kraft 2005). With central line administration, higher concentrations and more rapid rates of infusion may be used; concentrations of 20 to 40 mEq/100 mL at a maximum rate of 40 mEq/hour via central line have been safely administered (Hamill 1991; Kruse 1990).

Vesicant/irritant (at concentrations >0.1 mEq/mL); ensure proper needle or catheter placement prior to and during IV infusion. Avoid extravasation.

Extravasation management: If extravasation occurs, stop infusion immediately and disconnect (leave needle/cannula in place); gently aspirate extravasated solution (do NOT flush the line); initiate hyaluronidase antidote; remove needle/cannula; apply dry cold compresses (Hurst 2004; Reynolds 2014); elevate extremity.

Hyaluronidase: Intradermal or SubQ: Inject a total of 1 to 1.7 mL (15 units/mL) as five separate 0.2 to 0.3 mL injections (using a 25-gauge needle) into area of extravasation at the leading edge in a clockwise manner (MacCara 1983; Reynolds 2014; Zenk 1981)

Administration: Pediatric

Parenteral: Potassium must be diluted prior to parenteral administration. Do not administer IV push. In general, the dose, concentration of infusion, and rate of administration may be dependent on patient condition and specific institution policy.

Infusion rates (including all sources) (Fuhrman 2017; Hamill 1991; Klaus 1989; Kliegman 2016; Kruse 1990; Lafraniere 2006; Schaber 1985):

Non-critical care settings: Usual range: 0.2 to 0.5 mEq/kg/hour up to 10 mEq to 20 mEq/hour have been used.

Critical care settings/situations: Higher rates may be used; maximum rate: 1 mEq/kg/hour up to 40 mEq/hour; continuous cardiac monitoring recommended for rates >0.5 mEq/kg/hour

Vesicant/irritant (at concentrations >0.1 mEq/mL); ensure proper needle or catheter placement prior to and during IV infusion. Avoid extravasation. If extravasation occurs, stop infusion immediately and disconnect (leave needle/cannula in place); gently aspirate extravasated solution (do NOT flush the line); initiate hyaluronidase antidote (see Management of Drug Extravasations for more details); remove needle/cannula; apply dry cold compresses (Hurst 2004; Reynolds 2014); elevate extremity.

Vesicant/Extravasation Risk

Vesicant/irritant (at concentrations >0.1 mEq/mL)

Storage/Stability

Store at room temperature; do not freeze.

Preparation for Administration: Adult

Parenteral: Potassium must be diluted prior to parenteral administration. The concentration of infusion may be dependent on patient condition and specific institution policy. Some clinicians recommend that the maximum concentration for peripheral infusion is 10 mEq/100 mL and 20-40 mEq/100 mL for central infusions.

Preparation for Administration: Pediatric

Parenteral: Potassium must be diluted prior to parenteral administration. The concentration of infusion may be dependent on patient condition and specific institution policy. The maximum concentrations should be reserved for specific clinical situations (eg, fluid restricted).

Specific pediatric data limited and based on recommendations in adult patients and reported clinical experience for some pediatric centers (Corkins 2010; Hamill 1990; Klaus 1989; Kraft 2005; Kruse 1990; Lafraniere 2006; Murray 2014; Schaber 1985).

For peripheral administration, further dilution to a concentration ≤80 mEq/L (0.08 mEq/mL) for continuous infusion has been used; usual reported concentration is 40 to 60 mEq/L (0.04 to 0.06 mEq/mL).

For central line infusion, a maximum concentration up to 200 mEq/L (0.2 mEq/mL) has been used for infusions; usual reported concentration is 120 to 150 mEq/L (0.12 to 0.15 mEq/L); for potassium replacement (intermittent), higher concentration of 400 mEq/L (0.4 mEq/mL) has been used.

Compatibility

See Trissel’s IV Compatibility Database

Medication Patient Education with HCAHPS Considerations

• Discuss specific use of drug and side effects with patient as it relates to treatment. (HCAHPS: During this hospital stay, were you given any medicine that you had not taken before? Before giving you any new medicine, how often did hospital staff tell you what the medicine was for? How often did hospital staff describe possible side effects in a way you could understand?)

• Have patient report immediately to prescriber signs of high potassium (abnormal heartbeat, confusion, dizziness, passing out, weakness, shortness of breath, numbness or tingling feeling) or difficulty moving (HCAHPS).

• Educate patient about signs of a significant reaction (eg, wheezing; chest tightness; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin color; seizures; or swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat). Note: This is not a comprehensive list of all side effects. Patient should consult prescriber for additional questions.

Intended Use and Disclaimer: Should not be printed and given to patients. This information is intended to serve as a concise initial reference for health care professionals to use when discussing medications with a patient. You must ultimately rely on your own discretion, experience, and judgment in diagnosing, treating, and advising patients.

Medication Safety Issues
  Sound-alike/look-alike issues:
  Other safety concerns:
Contraindications

Severe renal impairment or adrenal insufficiency; hyperkalemia

Warnings/Precautions

Concerns related to adverse effects:

• Extravasation: Vesicant/irritant (at concentrations >0.1 mEq/mL); ensure proper catheter or needle position prior to and during infusion. Avoid extravasation.

• Hyperkalemia: Close monitoring of serum potassium concentrations is needed to avoid hyperkalemia; severe hyperkalemia may lead to muscle weakness/paralysis and cardiac conduction abnormalities (eg, heart block, ventricular arrhythmias, asystole).

Disease-related concerns:

• Acid/base disorders: Use with caution in patients with acid/base alterations; changes in serum potassium concentrations can occur during acid/base correction, monitor closely. In patients with metabolic or respiratory alkalosis, use with caution since use of potassium acetate may worsen alkalosis depending on the amount administered (Khanna 2006).

• Cardiovascular disease: Use with caution in patients with cardiovascular disease (eg, heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias); patients may be more susceptible to life-threatening cardiac effects associated with hyper/hypokalemia.

• Potassium-altering conditions/disorders: Use with caution in patients with disorders or conditions likely to contribute to altered serum potassium and hyperkalemia (eg, untreated Addison’s disease, heat cramps, severe tissue breakdown from trauma or burns).

• Renal impairment: Use with caution in patients with renal impairment; monitor serum potassium concentrations closely. Contraindicated with severe impairment.

Concurrent drug therapy issues:

• Digitalis: Use with caution in digitalized patients; may be more susceptible to potentially life-threatening cardiac effects with rapid changes in serum potassium concentrations.

• Potassium-altering therapies: Use with caution in patients receiving concomitant medications or therapies that increase potassium (eg, ACEIs, potassium-sparing diuretics, potassium containing salt substitutes).

Dosage form specific issues:

• Aluminum: The parenteral product may contain aluminum; toxic aluminum concentrations may be seen with high doses, prolonged use, or renal dysfunction. Premature neonates are at higher risk due to immature renal function and aluminum intake from other parenteral sources. Parenteral aluminum exposure of >4 to 5 mcg/kg/day is associated with CNS and bone toxicity; tissue loading may occur at lower doses (Federal Register, 2002). See manufacturer’s labeling.

Other warnings/precautions:

• Parenteral administration: Use extreme caution with parenteral administration and monitor serum potassium concentrations closely. Evaluate renal function, cardiac and fluid status, and any factors contributing to altered potassium concentrations (eg, acidosis, alkalosis) prior to therapy. Do NOT administer undiluted or IV push; inappropriate parenteral administration may be fatal. Always administer potassium further diluted; refer to appropriate dilution and administration rate recommendations. Pain and phlebitis may occur during parenteral infusion requiring a decrease in infusion rate or potassium concentration.

Pregnancy Considerations

Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted. Potassium requirements are the same in pregnant and nonpregnant women. Adverse events have not been observed following use of potassium supplements in healthy women with normal pregnancies. Use caution in pregnant women with other medical conditions (eg, pre-eclampsia; may be more likely to develop hyperkalemia) (IOM 2004).

Breast-Feeding Considerations

Potassium is excreted into breast milk (IOM 2004).

Adverse Reactions

Frequency not defined.

Cardiovascular: Cardiac arrhythmia, heart block, hypotension, paralysis, paresthesia

Central nervous system: Abnormal electroencephalogram, confusion, lethargy

Local: Local tissue necrosis (with extravasation)

Neuromuscular & skeletal: Weakness

Metabolism/Transport Effects

None known.

Drug Interactions 

Aliskiren: Potassium Salts may enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Aliskiren. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers: Potassium Salts may enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: Potassium Salts may enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Eplerenone: May enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Potassium Salts. Management: This combination is contraindicated in patients receiving eplerenone for treatment of hypertension.Risk D: Consider therapy modification

Heparin: May enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Potassium Salts. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Heparins (Low Molecular Weight): May enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Potassium Salts. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Nicorandil: May enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Potassium Salts. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Potassium-Sparing Diuretics: Potassium Salts may enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Potassium-Sparing Diuretics. Risk D: Consider therapy modification

Monitoring Parameters

Electrolytes (including serum potassium, bicarbonate, and magnesium), acid/base status; cardiac monitor (if intermittent infusion or potassium infusion rates 0.5 mEq/kg/hour in children or >10 mEq/hour in adults); to assess adequate replacement, repeat serum potassium level 2 to 4 hours after dose. Monitor IV infusion site for extravasation.

Reference Range

Note: Reference ranges may vary depending on the laboratory

Serum potassium: 3.5 to 5.2 mEq/L

Dosage Forms: US

Excipient information presented when available (limited, particularly for generics); consult specific product labeling. [DSC] = Discontinued product

Solution, Intravenous:

Generic: 2 mEq/mL (20 mL, 50 mL, 100 mL [DSC]); 4 mEq/mL (50 mL [DSC])

Dosage Forms: Canada

Excipient information presented when available (limited, particularly for generics); consult specific product labeling.

Solution, Intravenous:

Generic: 4 mEq/mL (50ml)

Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) Classification
  • B05XA17
Generic Available (US)

Yes

Pricing: US

Solution (Potassium Acetate Intravenous)

2 mEq/mL (per mL): $0.19 – $0.32

Disclaimer: A representative AWP (Average Wholesale Price) price or price range is provided as reference price only. A range is provided when more than one manufacturer’s AWP price is available and uses the low and high price reported by the manufacturers to determine the range. The pricing data should be used for benchmarking purposes only, and as such should not be used alone to set or adjudicate any prices for reimbursement or purchasing functions or considered to be an exact price for a single product and/or manufacturer. Medi-Span expressly disclaims all warranties of any kind or nature, whether express or implied, and assumes no liability with respect to accuracy of price or price range data published in its solutions. In no event shall Medi-Span be liable for special, indirect, incidental, or consequential damages arising from use of price or price range data. Pricing data is updated monthly.

Mechanism of Action

Potassium is the major cation of intracellular fluid and is essential for the conduction of nerve impulses in heart, brain, and skeletal muscle; contraction of cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscles; maintenance of normal renal function, acid-base balance, carbohydrate metabolism, and gastric secretion

Pharmacodynamics/Kinetics

Distribution: Enters cells via active transport from extracellular fluid

Excretion: Primarily urine; skin and feces (small amounts); most intestinal potassium reabsorbed

Local Anesthetic/Vasoconstrictor Precautions

No information available to require special precautions

Effects on Dental Treatment

No significant effects or complications reported

Effects on Bleeding

No information available to require special precautions

FDA Approval Date
July 20, 1984
References

Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition. Fed Regist. 2002;67(244):77792-77793. To be codified at 21 CFR §201.323.

Corkins MR, Balint J, Bobo E, et al, eds. The A.S.P.E.N Pediatric Nutrition Support Core Curriculum. 2nd ed. Silver Spring: MD: American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 2015.

Flurie RW, Brophy DF, et al. Pharmacotherapy: A Pathophysiologic Approach, 10th ed. Chapter 51: Disorders of Potassium and Magnesium Homeostasis. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education. Available at http://accesspharmacy.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=1861&sectionid=134127639. 2017.

Fuhrman B, Zimmerman J, eds. Pediatric Critical Care. 5th ed. Elsevier Health; 2017.

Hadaway L. Infiltration and extravasation. Am J Nurs. 2007;107(8):64-72.[PubMed 17667395]

Hamill RJ, Robinson LM, Wexler HR, et al, “Efficacy and Safety of Potassium Infusion Therapy in Hypokalemic Critically Ill Patients,” Crit Care Med, 1991, 19(5):694-9.[PubMed 2026032]

Hurst S, McMillan M. Innovative solutions in critical care units: extravasation guidelines. Dimens Crit Care Nurs. 2004;23(3):125-128.[PubMed 15192356]

IOM (Institute of Medicine), Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate, Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2004.

Khanna A, Kurtzman NA. Metabolic alkalosis. J Nephrol. 2006;19(Suppl 9):S86-S96.[PubMed 16736446]

Khilnani P, “Electrolyte Abnormalities in Critically Ill Children,” Crit Care Med, 1992, 20(2):241-50.[PubMed 1737458]

Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Gemell JW, et al, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2016.

Kraft MD, Btaiche IF, Sacks GS, Kudsk KA. Treatment of electrolyte disorders in adult patients in the intensive care unit. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2005, 62(16):1663-1682.[PubMed 16085929]

Kruse JA, Clark VL, Carlson RW, Geheb MA. Concentrated potassium chloride infusions in critically ill patients with hypokalemia. J Clin Pharmacol. 1994;34(11):1077-1082.[PubMed 7876399]

MacCara ME. Extravasation: a hazard of intravenous therapy. Drug Intell Clin Pharm. 1983;17(10):713.[PubMed 6628223]

Potassium acetate injection [prescribing information]. Lenoir, NC: Exela Pharma Sciences, LLC.; October 2015.

Reynolds PM, MacLaren R, Mueller SW, Fish DN, Kiser TH. Management of extravasation injuries: a focused evaluation of noncytotoxic medications. Pharmacotherapy. 2014;34(6):617-632.[PubMed 24420913]

Zenk KE. Management of intravenous extravasations. Infusion. 1981;5(4):77-79.

Potassium Acetate (Patient Education – Adult Medication)
You must carefully read the “Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer” below in order to understand and correctly use this information
Pronunciation

(poe TASS ee um AS e tate)

What is this drug used for?
  • It is used to treat or prevent low potassium levels.
What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take this drug?
  • If you have an allergy to potassium acetate or any other part of this drug.
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you have any of these health problems: High potassium levels or kidney disease.
  • If you have adrenal gland problems.
  • This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this drug.
  • Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this drug with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.
What are some things I need to know or do while I take this drug?
  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take this drug. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Have blood work checked as you have been told by the doctor. Talk with the doctor.
  • You may need to have an ECG checked before starting this drug and while taking it. Talk with your doctor.
  • If you are taking a salt substitute that has potassium in it, a potassium-sparing diuretic, or a potassium product, talk with your doctor.
  • This drug may contain aluminum. There is a chance of aluminum toxicity if you are on this drug for a long time. The risk is greater if you have kidney problems. The risk is also higher in premature infants. Talk with the doctor.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using this drug while you are pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.
What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?
  • WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:
  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of a high potassium level like a heartbeat that does not feel normal; change in thinking clearly and with logic; feeling weak, lightheaded, or dizzy; feel like passing out; numbness or tingling; or shortness of breath.
  • Trouble moving around.
What are some other side effects of this drug?
  • All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if you have any side effects that bother you or do not go away.
  • These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.
  • You may report side effects to your national health agency.
How is this drug best taken?
  • Use this drug as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.
  • It is given as an infusion into a vein over a period of time after being added to fluids.
What do I do if I miss a dose?
  • Call your doctor to find out what to do.
How do I store and/or throw out this drug?
  • If you need to store this drug at home, talk with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist about how to store it.
General drug facts
  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else’s drugs.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your doctor.
  • Talk with the doctor before starting any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. If you have any questions about this drug, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.
Potassium Acetate (Patient Education – Pediatric Medication)
You must carefully read the “Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer” below in order to understand and correctly use this information
Pronunciation

(poe TASS ee um AS e tate)

What is this drug used for?
  • It is used to treat or prevent low potassium levels.
What do I need to tell the doctor BEFORE my child takes this drug?
  • If your child has an allergy to this drug or any part of this drug.
  • If your child is allergic to any drugs like this one or any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell the doctor about the allergy and what signs your child had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If your child has any of these health problems: Adrenal gland problems, high potassium levels, or kidney problems.
  • This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this drug.
  • Tell the doctor and pharmacist about all of your child’s drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for your child to take this drug with all of his/her drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug your child takes without checking with the doctor.
What are some things I need to know or do while my child takes this drug?
  • Tell all of your child’s health care providers that your child is taking this drug. This includes your child’s doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Have blood work checked as you have been told by the doctor. Talk with the doctor.
  • Your child may need to have an ECG checked while taking this drug. Talk with the doctor.
  • If your child is taking a salt substitute that has potassium in it, a potassium-sparing diuretic, or a potassium product, talk with your child’s doctor.
  • This drug may contain aluminum. There is a chance of aluminum toxicity if your child is on this drug for a long time. The risk is greater if your child has kidney problems. The risk is also higher in premature infants. Talk with the doctor.
  • If your child is pregnant or breast-feeding a baby:
  • Talk with the doctor if your child is pregnant, becomes pregnant, or is breast-feeding a baby. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks to your child and the baby.
What are some side effects that I need to call my child’s doctor about right away?
  • WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your child’s doctor or get medical help right away if your child has any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:
  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of a high potassium level like a heartbeat that does not feel normal; change in thinking clearly and with logic; feeling weak, lightheaded, or dizzy; feel like passing out; numbness or tingling; or shortness of breath.
  • Trouble moving around.
What are some other side effects of this drug?
  • All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your child’s doctor or get medical help if your child has any side effects that bother your child or do not go away.
  • These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your child’s doctor. Call your child’s doctor for medical advice about side effects.
  • You may report side effects to your national health agency.
How is this drug best given?
  • Give this drug as ordered by your child’s doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.
  • It is given as an infusion into a vein over a period of time after being added to fluids.
What do I do if my child misses a dose?
  • Call your child’s doctor to find out what to do.
How do I store and/or throw out this drug?
  • If you need to store this drug at home, talk with your child’s doctor, nurse, or pharmacist about how to store it.
General drug facts
  • If your child’s symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your child’s doctor.
  • Do not share your child’s drug with others and do not give anyone else’s drug to your child.
  • Keep a list of all your child’s drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your child’s doctor.
  • Talk with your child’s doctor before giving your child any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. If you have any questions about this drug, please talk with your child’s doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.